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December 1, 2012

Disassembling HTC Touch 3G

Unlike those wealthy geeks (hint hint), I don’t always have some latest coolest high tech gadgets to unbox.

All I’ve are those broken or antique devices like alarm clocks, electronic toys, radio, laptops, to be assembled.

It all began with ruining my dad’s antique calculator when I was a kid. It wasn’t my fault, he did not keep his screwdrivers away from me, who to blame?

It’s been a long time I didn’t do such thing. My natural instinct is unstoppable again, when my 4 y.o. HTC Touch 3G become untouchable

HTC Touch 3G

* Problem rectified after replaced the broken digitizer with new one.

Filed under: Logs — Tags: , , , , — GG @ 8:51 pm

Linux command – 1.4 – File operation

cat – concatenate file(s) or standard input to standard output.

Usage:

cat [option] [file]

Options:

-A, --show-all
equivalent to -vET-b, --number-nonblank
number nonempty output lines, overrides -n

-e
equivalent to -vE

-E, --show-ends
display $ at end of each line

-n, --number
number all output lines

-s, --squeeze-blank
suppress repeated empty output lines

-T, --show-tabs
display TAB characters as ^I

-u
(ignored)

-v, --show-nonprinting
use ^ and M- notation, except for LFD and TAB

Example: Combine 2 files

$ cat file1 file2 > newfile

Example: Append a file to another file

$ cat file1 >> file2

cp – copy / duplicate files and/or directories

Usage:

cp [option] [source] [destination]

Options:

-a, --archive
same as -dR --preserve=all--attributes-only
don't copy the file data, just the attributes

--backup[=CONTROL]
make a backup of each existing destination file

-b like --backup but does not accept an argument

--copy-contents
copy contents of special files when recursive

-d same as --no-dereference --preserve=links

-f, --force
if an existing destination file cannot be opened, remove it and try again (redundant if the -n option is used)

-i, --interactive
prompt before overwrite (overrides a previous -n option)

-H follow command-line symbolic links in SOURCE

-l, --link
hard link files instead of copying

-L, --dereference
always follow symbolic links in SOURCE

-n, --no-clobber
do not overwrite an existing file (overrides a previous -i option)

-P, --no-dereference
never follow symbolic links in SOURCE

-p same as --preserve=mode,ownership,timestamps

--preserve[=ATTR_LIST]
preserve the specified attributes (default: mode,ownership,timestamps), if possible additional attributes: context, links, xattr, all

-c same as --preserve=context

--no-preserve=ATTR_LIST
don't preserve the specified attributes

--parents
use full source file name under DIRECTORY

-R, -r, --recursive
copy directories recursively

--reflink[=WHEN]
control clone/CoW copies. See below

--remove-destination
remove each existing destination file before attempting to open it (contrast with --force)

--sparse=WHEN
control creation of sparse files. See below

--strip-trailing-slashes
remove any trailing slashes from each SOURCE argument

-s, --symbolic-link
make symbolic links instead of copying

-S, --suffix=SUFFIX
override the usual backup suffix

-t, --target-directory=DIRECTORY
copy all SOURCE arguments into DIRECTORY

-T, --no-target-directory
treat DEST as a normal file

-u, --update
copy only when the SOURCE file is newer than the destination file or when the destination file is missing

-v, --verbose
explain what is being done

-x, --one-file-system
stay on this file system

-Z, --context=CONTEXT
set security context of copy to CONTEXT

Example: Copy file1 to file2

$ cp file1 file2

Example: Create a new symbolic link of file1 as file2

$ cp -s file1 file2

mv – move / rename files and/or directories

Usage:

mv [option] [source] [destination]

Options:

--backup[=CONTROL]
make a backup of each existing destination file-b
like --backup but does not accept an argument

-f, --force
do not prompt before overwriting

-i, --interactive
prompt before overwrite

-n, --no-clobber
do not overwrite an existing file

--strip-trailing-slashes
remove any trailing slashes from each SOURCE argument

-S, --suffix=SUFFIX
override the usual backup suffix

-t, --target-directory=DIRECTORY
move all SOURCE arguments into DIRECTORY

-T, --no-target-directory
treat DEST as a normal file

-u, --update
move only when the SOURCE file is newer than the destination file or when the destination file is missing

-v, --verbose
explain what is being done

Example: Rename file1 to file2

$ mv file1 file2

Example: Move folder to a new destination

$ mv /path/to/source /path/to/destination

mkdir – make a new directory

Usage:

mkdir [option] [dir]

Options:

-m, --mode=MODE
set file mode (as in chmod), not a=rwx - umask-p, --parents
no error if existing, make parent directories as needed

-v, --verbose
print a message for each created directory

-Z, --context=CTX
set the SELinux security context of each created directory to CTX

Example: Making a new directory and print a message explaining what is being done

$ mkdir -v NewFolder
mkdir: created directory `NewFolder'

rm – remove / delete a file

Usage:

rm [option] [file]

Options:

-f, --force
ignore nonexistent files, never prompt-i
prompt before every removal

-I
prompt once before removing more than three files, or when removing recursively. Less intrusive than -i, while still giving protection against most mistakes

--interactive[=WHEN]
prompt according to WHEN: never, once (-I), or always (-i). Without WHEN, prompt always

--one-file-system
when removing a hierarchy recursively, skip any directory that is on a file system different from that of the corresponding command line argument

--no-preserve-root
do not treat `/' specially

--preserve-root
do not remove `/' (default)

-r, -R, --recursive
remove directories and their contents recursively

-v, --verbose
explain what is being done

Example: Remove a directory and print a message explaining what is being done

user@ubuntu:~$ rm -rv test2
removed directory: `test2'

ln – create symbolic link

Usage:

ln [source] [destination](create a link to TARGET with the name LINK_NAME)
ln [OPTION] [-T] TARGET LINK_NAME

(create a link to TARGET in the current directory)
ln [OPTION] TARGET

(create links to each TARGET in DIRECTORY)
ln [OPTION] TARGET DIRECTORY
ln [OPTION] -t DIRECTORY TARGET

Create hard links by default, symbolic links with --symbolic. When creating hard links, each TARGET must exist. Symbolic links can hold arbitrary text; if later resolved, a relative link is interpreted in relation to its parent directory.

Options:

--backup[=CONTROL]
make a backup of each existing destination file-b
like --backup but does not accept an argument

-d, -F, --directory
allow the superuser to attempt to hard link directories (note: will probably fail due to system restrictions, even for the superuser)

-f, --force
remove existing destination files

-i, --interactive
prompt whether to remove destinations

-L, --logical
make hard links to symbolic link references

-n, --no-dereference
treat destination that is a symlink to a directory as if it were a normal file

-P, --physical
make hard links directly to symbolic links

-s, --symbolic
make symbolic links instead of hard links

-S, --suffix=SUFFIX
override the usual backup suffix

-t, --target-directory=DIRECTORY
specify the DIRECTORY in which to create the links

-T, --no-target-directory
treat LINK_NAME as a normal file

-v, --verbose
print name of each linked file

--help
display this help and exit

--version
output version information and exit

touch – update the access time and last modified date for a file to the current time and date

Usage:

touch [option] [file]

Options:

-a
change only the access time-c, --no-create
do not create any files

-d, --date=STRING
parse STRING and use it instead of current time

-f
(ignored)

-h, --no-dereference
affect each symbolic link instead of any referenced file (useful only on systems that can change the timestamps of a symlink)

-m
change only the modification time

-r, --reference=FILE
use this file's times instead of current time

-t STAMP
use [[CC]YY]MMDDhhmm[.ss] instead of current time

--time=WORD
change the specified time: WORD is access, atime, or use: equivalent to -a WORD is modify or mtime: equivalent to -m

Example: Change the access time of a file to specified date

$ touch -t 199912131415 filename
Filed under: Linux — Tags: , , , , , , , — GG @ 3:37 pm

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